What’s your healthcare brand’s Digital EKG?

What’s your healthcare brand’s Digital EKG?

During an annual exam, your physician can get a good sense of your heart health with an EKG.   As healthcare marketers, a Brand EKG can also give you a quick read of your brand’s health.  Several years ago, this model was introduced to help hospitals, namely C-Suite representatives, understand consumer research findings and implications. As indicated above and based on the classic consumer marketing behavior model, a brand has to have established a strong sense of awareness and preference before leading to trial.  This model has been expanded to include brand attributes such as likability, intent to recommend, and other layers of behavior.  Based on an analysis of nearly 100 consumer studies, and validated by leading healthcare researchers, we concluded that a “healthy” brand EKG would have a variance of 12-15 percentage points between key indicators.  A larger number would indicate an “unhealthy” brand that is not converting on the preceding attitude.  For example, a brand with a preference score 20 percentage points higher than usage is not converting market share.  This could be the result of many factors including accessibility, customer service, and operational considerations (schedule, capacity, etc.).  Those brands not converting awareness to preference indicate a lack of differentiation or strong consumer brand relevance. Fast forward to 2019, and the same model can be used to assess the health of your digital marketing efforts. Springboard’s Digital EKG Healthcare marketers can add to their digital dashboards by providing a Digital Brand EKG indicating the level of conversion being established from a preceding behavior. For example, if impressions served (or similar metric) are significantly higher than CTR, you’ve done a good job targeting and delivering your digital message but you have not enticed anyone to take action.  If you’re creating an action and people are clicking through but not engaging, then your landing page, website, or other content “hub” is not compelling enough. Adding an EKG to your current digital dashboard will help you and your team understand the layers of consumer behavior that are taking place with each online activity.  Better yet, you’ll be able to develop content strategies and tactics to improve upon your ability to convert consumers through the behavior model. Better still, you’ll be able to strengthen the other metrics on your dashboard and impress the C-Suite with the health of your brand and EKG in terms (and formats) they’ll understand and appreciate.  You might even be able to include B.D. initials after your name – Brand Doctor. Happy to help you assess your brand and digital health. Contact us...
8 Bad Habits to Avoid in Healthcare Marketing

8 Bad Habits to Avoid in Healthcare Marketing

As the new year kicks in, there are all sorts of tips and habits to break in order to help improve your personal and professional success.  For those in healthcare marketing, here are eight bad habits that need to be broken to help fix your strategies and outcomes. Focusing on marketing and not business building Marketing in many healthcare organizations still lands on the promotional side of the equation.  Successful marketers are those who understand the growth goals of their organization and develop strategies, beyond campaigns and clicks, to generate revenue and support new customer acquisition. Developing the wrong dashboards You know you’re too focused on the promotional side of things when your marketing “dashboard” consists of primarily digital terms that leave the C-Suite in the dust.  When you include business metrics, too, your dashboard will truly provide a snapshot of your organization’s marketing success in terms of share-of-wallet, customer acquisition, profit margin, and conversion rates.  These will be sure to get the attention of your CEO and put your department and initiatives in a new light. Using market research to learn all about yourself Most market research studies ask a lot of questions about the brand, not about the customer.  Other than demographics at the end, very few ask consumers, for example, about their interests and passions, what’s important to them, and the issues they’re most interested in.  Look at your customer research from their POV and you’ll gain great insights on how to make your marketing strategies much more relevant and engaging. Not having a clearly defined brand position It’s head scratching and nail biting to develop a brand position that your organization can own, fits like a glove, and is different and relevant to the marketplace.  But, oh is it worthwhile.  Without this, your brand defaults to a “me too” position and means everything to everybody.  Absolutely the opposite of what a brand position should be about. Messaging that is all chest beat, not heartbeat We talk about “Heartbeat Branding”  as the intersection between culture, product benefits, and customer needs.  It takes great insights about your customer and a continuous nature of learning, observation, and discovery about your marketplace to develop a heartbeat for your brand.  The opposite side of this spectrum is a chest beat brand, one that only talks about itself and reels off a list of attributes and features.  I’m sure you can guess the approach that is more interesting and engaging. Copy Overload With over 5,000 messages a day vying for the average person’s attention, studies show an approximate 8-second time span to make your point.  This is why more communications are going visual; to capture attention, gain engagement, motive toward an action. There is always an important place for keywords and copy, but keep them short. Being Too Social Social media is no doubt powerful, but it doesn’t need to be “too” social.  Brand strategies should drive your posts and, as with every other media, shouldn’t be “all things to all people.”  Overly social posts don’t benefit from optimization of keywords and tend not to stay on brand, rather, they take your message in an entirely different direction.  You can drive engagement and interaction without sacrificing the integrity of your posts and brand platform. Not making your internal audience a priority Internal communications has evolved over the years from a preview of an ad campaign to an engagement strategy with real ROI.  Hospitals experiencing “leakage” often find that employees are unaware of the scope of services provided by their health system.  Physician practices find that making in-system referrals can be tedious and time-consuming, therefore defaulting to old habits.  As healthcare companies grow through merger and acquisition, it’s more imperative than ever to not only educate, but facilitate communications from within. We’re only one month in for 2019, and there’s still lots of time and opportunity to strengthen your healthcare branding and marketing strategies.  Time flies, so take a moment to reflect on these suggestions and avoid defaulting to old habits that weaken your position, both personally and...
Healthcare Branding: 8 Ideas for Managing the “8 Second Rule” for Healthcare Brands

Healthcare Branding: 8 Ideas for Managing the “8 Second Rule” for Healthcare Brands

When it comes to reaching and motivating consumers, healthcare marketers face a double “whammy.” First, studies show that the average person is exposed to 7,500 brand messages and marketing content every day.  The School of Human Sciences and Technology estimates that people switch between screens up to 21 times an hour. As a result of this overload, the average person’s attention span is eight seconds! What makes this even more complicated for healthcare marketers is the second whammy; making healthcare messaging engaging, simple, digestible, and differentiating in less time than it takes to say “multi-disciplinary, comprehensive, continuum of care.” As healthcare systems continue to grow adding new capabilities, physician practices, and other services, messaging becomes more complex – all the while consumers are giving them less time. Here are 8 ideas on how you can manage the “8 Second Rule” for healthcare brands A long-time colleague, copywriter and tagline maestro friend of mine, Jim Morris, developed a great tagline for taglines, “Long story, short.” I’ve always loved the power and simplicity of this idea. A tagline becomes a part of the brand’s lore and legacy.  Healthcare brands still sound unimaginably similar. And the development of a unique, crafty tagline is one way to stand out and live on after your eight seconds are up.  So much more to say on this, but I’ll keep it short. Consistency of messaging from one medium to next, one screen to the next, is also another important idea. Too many brands have too many different “faces” from one screen to the next. Knowing your time is limited, should limit this practice. Become a “heartbeat” brand. Since consumers spend so little time on your message, it should be about them, not you.  Understand your customers and create messaging that is as relevant to their lifestyle, interests and passions as possible. Digital re-marketing is another way to stick with consumers.   If they’ve visited your website or landing page and then moved on, well look at that – there’s a banner ad on their social media feed or other web site.  Use digital marketing as an effective and cost-efficient way to re-connect. Many healthcare brands are undifferentiated from each other. And that starts with a lack of clear positioning and strategy, not good creative.  So, the more time you spend up-front will result in more time spent by consumers who see a real interesting difference with your brand. Common to all these ideas is the fine-tuning of your target group. The better you know your audience and their media habits, the better you’ll be in reaching them on a “cluster” strategy basis; media that runs at the same time in similar formats/programming.  This is an extremely effective way to “double down” on your message and get the most bang from a narrow period of time. You have eight seconds to make a strong impression. Sounds like a dating site line or hair product.  In truth, there is a correlation and when shared it needs to be bold and make a statement that someone will remember.  So, when they come across your brand again, they’ll embrace it, not erase it. The old adage, Keep It Simple Stupid (KISS) still applies here. With only a dash of time to resonate with consumers, your message has to be clear and uncomplicated.  Here is where healthcare brands go awry.  By the time all the cliche’s and technology terms are used, it’s way beyond the eight-second mark.  Easy solution – read ideas 1-7 again and focus on what should be said, not what your organization thinks needs to be said. Thank you for spending more than eight seconds on reading this post.  I hope it has provided you with some ideas for getting the most time with your customers.  And also giving your brand new relevance and engagement strategies.  You may now move to the next screen. Contact Springboard for more information on healthcare...
Healthcare Marketers: Lessons from the Shark Tank

Healthcare Marketers: Lessons from the Shark Tank

I had the pleasure to present at the SHSMD Connections conference in Seattle a few weeks ago.  My co-presenter, and fellow disruptor, Paul Szablowski and I were thrilled to see a full house for our session.  Healthcare marketers were eager to learn business lessons from the hit reality television show “Shark Tank.” Healthcare marketers are under constant scrutiny from their CEO’s to demonstrate value and Return on Marketing Investment (ROMI).  Walking into a shark tank each time budgeting and annual planning rolls around is all too much a reality. Here’s a recap of our presentation.  If it leaves you swimming with questions or additional thoughts, I look forward to hearing from you. The Waters are Murky for Healthcare Marketers Marketers in all industries are facing intense pressure to perform for their organization.  Many studies suggest that there is definitely a realignment needed between the C-Suite and marketing department in terms of expectations, accountability, and responsibilities.  Nearly three quarters of CEO’s want their marketing department to focus on growth goals and new customer acquisition. And the same percentage of healthcare marketers believe their jobs are not designed to let them achieve this for their organizations. Perhaps this is why the average tenure of a Chief Marketing Officer is only four years – the shortest length of any position in the C-Suite. Another reason is that healthcare marketers have focused too much on “marketing” and not enough on growth goals.  So before walking into your “shark tank,” this mindset  has to shift or you’ll be quick to sink in your organization. Lesson 1:  Know your role Yes, you’re The Director of Marketing (or V.P, CMO, etc.).  But you’re not meeting with your C-Suite to discuss cool tactics, gross impressions, or events that fulfill the mission of the organization.  You’re meeting to discuss how your insights on the market and in-depth knowledge of your customer base.  And also continuous discovery is leading the organization through the consumer-driven economy of healthcare.  Your role is that of a contemporary marketing leader whose job encompasses the entire enterprise and reflects the perspective of the customer leading to creating new growth for the organization. As you enter the shark tank, tell them who you are and what you do; you’re leading marketing, not “doing” marketing!  You know how to motivate and inspire teams across the organization and draw them to a common vision of brand relevance. Lesson 2:  The “Pitch” vs. The Dialogue Your time in the “shark tank” is limited and you only have one shot to make a business case for the organization’s marketing investment.  As tempting as it is to make a “pitch,” you have to use that time to take on a consultative role with your leadership.  And also create a dialogue that gets them engaged with your thinking and approach. Remember, it’s not about you (and your pitch for dollars).  It’s about the organization’s growth and the investment required to attract new patients and revenue.  Move from being perceived as an expense to being an asset! Lesson 3:  Know your numbers The investment your organization is willing to make in marketing is the output from your time in the shark tank.  Knowledge and vision is the input that will be required to talk with your leadership team. Like any corporation, the C-suite is responsible for earnings, growth targets, and market share.  It is important that you keep the marketing dialogue around these metrics and not necessarily those of a website dashboard.  CEO’s don’t really care all that much about digital impressions; they trust you know your marketing stuff and all that is effective.  What they want to know is marketing’s role in customer retention, new patient acquisition, lifetime value of a patient, contribution margin, and share of wallet; or the depth of an individual’s healthcare relationship with your organization. Lesson 4:  Differentiation If you’re a fan of the show “Shark Tank,” you’ll know that one of the first questions asked by the panel is “what makes you different?”  In healthcare, unlike consumer packaged goods, this answer is often difficult to provide.  Based on growth goals, you’ll need to know exactly what makes your organization or service line different.  You’ll also want to know how you’re going to leverage that distinction and the optimized results it will generate. Avoid the 7 deadly words (7 Deadly Words in Healthcare Advertising) of healthcare advertising.  They will not only NOT differentiate your enterprise, they will infuriate your C-suite and kill your dialogue. Your brand differentiation must sync with your customer’s lifestyle, their passions and interests to create a heartbeat, not a chest beat. (Branding: It’s About Heartbeat, Not Chest Beat).  It must uniquely position your organization in a crowded marketplace. It’s important that you carefully examine your brand and the real value it represents.  Regardless of where you think your brand is, making the pivot to the consumer requires truly understanding where your brand sits in the market. Lesson 5:  Answering tough questions Anticipating questions is as important as preparing for your discussion in the tank.  You must to be prepared, know your stuff, and know your audience.  Remember, you’re selling yourself as much as you are your ideas.  Mostly, it’s a dialogue you’re having about your “buyers” making an investment – not a “pitch” asking for funds. Your ability to open the eyes of the C-suite with knowledge of financial terms and concepts, insights of the marketplace, and sources of new customer acquisition is what will generate a healthy discussion and position you as a leader within the organization, not merely a marketing director. Keep swimming with bold strokes Yes, the waters are getting murkier for healthcare marketers.  But if you do more than stay afloat, and charter a course based on sound business strategy and strong insights, you’ll impress your leadership “shark tank.”  Finally, you will also improve your chances for attaining the investment you need to help your enterprise grow.  And that’s exactly what you’re being asked to do. If you have questions about our...
Healthcare Brands Require Strong Internal Engagement

Healthcare Brands Require Strong Internal Engagement

Whether a hospital system, specialty practice, medical association, or device company, healthcare brands will only thrive with strong internal engagement. This is especially important with the rapid consolidation in the healthcare industry today. For providers, where referrals among medical staff members and sub-specialties make or break the system, engagement is paramount. When we conduct focus groups with internal teams at leading health systems, most employees do not know the “5 W’s and H” within their own organization: “who it consists of” “what’s expected of them” “why should they care” “where they should refer” “when” “how” As a result, organizations experience great leakage of patients, and revenue. Communications strategies help address many of the unknowns. Internal campaigns including brand overviews, videos, books, and other tactics can explain the size and scope of the organization. Of course, graphic standards manuals are essential. Especially in terms of presenting healthcare brands in a consistent and unified manner, no matter which architecture strategy is being developed. Online tools and staff profiles will also help facilitate referrals from one practice to another or among sub-specialties. Most healthcare professionals understand “when” referrals should be made.  However, soft reminders are sometimes needed for family physicians who would rather treat their patient than “lose” them to a referral. Key here is to develop protocols.  These ensure the primary care provider gets their patient back after specialty procedures or consultations are performed. That takes care of most of the W’s and H. Let’s focus on the “why”. Really(!?), employees have to be told why they need to care about keeping patients within the health system? Unfortunately, they do. It’s always eye-opening and mind-boggling when you meet with internal stakeholders and suggest they be accountable to their organization for patient referrals. And being accountable means knowing the who’s who and what’s what within the enterprise. The “why” should be answered with “because it’s your job, and you lose risking it because there won’t be enough money for your paycheck!” In all my years working with healthcare companies, I’ve only heard a couple CEO’s be this overt and direct with employees about keeping referrals in-house. There’s not an “I” in accountability, but there certainly is a “Y”. By the way, both of these CEO’s and their organizations are extremely successful. Most employees want to support their employer and do what’s necessary to see it be successful and remain gainfully employed. The issue is, most aren’t told the “why” in the most direct fashion.  As a result, they don’t pay enough attention to the other “W’s.” Internal engagement strategies are hugely important for brands to be successful, regardless of the industry. They just need to be bolder, more emphatic, and include language that hit both the heart and wallet of their employees. If this strikes a chord and stirs your senses, give me a call to discuss healthcare brands at 847.398.4920 or email Rob@springboardbrand.com. You can also contact us...
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