“Conquesting” New Patients in Healthcare Marketing

“Conquesting” New Patients in Healthcare Marketing

You probably already have ads out there targeting specific populations based on demographics to promote awareness of your hospital and attract new patients.  Now, let’s take it to the next level and apply that marketing strategy with location.  What if you could target your competitors’ patients and feed them ads about the benefits of switching to healthcare providers or services at your hospital?  Sounds cool, right? Picture this.  A patient is sitting in the ER waiting room at a nearby hospital, anticipating his turn to be seen.  To pass the time, he plays games on his smartphone, looks at his social media feeds, and browses various websites.  An ad pops up promoting your hospital, specifically the short wait times in the E.R.  The patient doesn’t have to think twice about what he should do.  He packs up and makes the trip across town to your hospital for that faster service. Geo-Conquesting Location-based mobile advertising, called geo-conquesting, allows you to specifically target potential patients who are physically located at your competitor’s location.  On average, smartphone users are on their phones more than 150 times a day – making it an easy way to also reach consumers who are interested in the services you offer. With geo-conquesting, you set a virtual perimeter around competitor hospitals, clinics or health centers.  This allows you to target ads to smartphone users who enter within the set perimeter.  Remember, you need to give patients a valid reason to leave your competitor.  Whether you are promoting exercise classes, parenting education courses, webinars or simply wanting to increase volume with new patients, geo-conquesting can help reach people who are already in a healthcare setting. In addition, through this type of advertising, you inform patients that there is an alternative to healthcare services, besides at the facility that they just entered. Enhance your advertising by targeting new patients with geo-conquesting.  They already have a need for healthcare services based on their physical location.  Take it a step further with regular digital advertising and discover how geo-conquesting can help your hospital grow. Contact Springboard for more...
Transition of Chief Marketing Officer to Chief Growth Officer

Transition of Chief Marketing Officer to Chief Growth Officer

Last year brought about many major shifts and conversations in the healthcare industry; from new national health plans to ongoing debates of repeal or reform of the Affordable Care Act. All of these have had an impact on healthcare marketing and most organizations are holding tight on any specific directions until policies are determined. Another trend that healthcare marketers have to watch, based on what has occurred in the land of big brands, is the shift from the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) to Chief Growth Officer (CGO). Leave it to Coca-Cola, one of the best known and most valuable brands on the globe to lead the way. When its Chief Marketing Officer resigned in 2017, Coca-Cola didn’t replace his position.  This was the first time the company was without a Chief Marketing Officer in a couple of decades. Rather, it hired a CGO and now other big brands have followed suit. This trend will certainly lead to some alterations in hospital marketing departments, too. The rationale for this change at Coke was that it was part of a restructuring to turn the company into a “growth oriented, and consumer-centered   organization.” Wait, what? Coca-Cola replaced its top­ ranked marketing executive with another position that will generate growth and provide a consumer focus. Isn’t that marketing’s job? Shouldn’t a top marketer be doing that? Bottom-line, marketing at Coke and at many global brands, is not seen as a “growth” department; one that adds revenue, new operations, and new customers to the organization. Startling, yes-and here are some supportive statistics: Nearly one-third of CEO’s considered firing their Chief Marketing Officer in 2017 according to Forrester Research The average tenure of CMO’s in the US is four years, the shortest in the C-Suite CMO’s are first in the line of fire if growth targets are not met, according to an Accenture Strategy Study Only 21 percent of companies are able to fully measure marketing’s contribution to revenue (Allocadia) 30 percent of all C-Suite dissatisfaction occurs by incorrectly setting expectations and failing to onboard customers 61 percent of CMO’s cite pressure from CEO’s to provide results; 58 percent say that pressure is increasing (Deloitte) What’s a Chief Marketing Officer to Do? The first change that CMO’s need to make is to shift their own perception of their job function and those of marketing professionals in their departments. Too many still think of their role as traditional marketing; conducting research, determining product position and the other P’s, devising target audience plans, and creating integrated communications to reach, motivate, and shift attitudes of prospective customers. And this is not wrong-but it is not the focus for the top-ranked marketing executive in their respective organization. CMO’s have to take a higher view, and make broader, more disruptive decisions that impact the growth of the organization, not just its perception. These individuals and departments need to: Focus on brand-growing, and not just brand building. Marketers need to shift their attention to the complete brand experience, not just brand promotions. This is especially true for those in healthcare systems where patient experience is having a direct impact on the bottom-line. Develop plans that demonstrate real value to the core growth goals of the organization, not marketing plans that extend what was done in the past. CMO’s and other top marketing executives have to scrap marketing plans and begin to submit market growth plans to their CEO’s. Make monumental shifts in the organization’s marketing DNA, not slight changes that will go unnoticed internally. CMO’s have to be seen as disruptive and taking new paths within their organizations, shaking it up. Shift from the discipline of marketing to the business of marketing operations that directly impacts revenue operations. Develop business solutions, not creative solutions. There are still too many top marketing executives who are in the weeds in terms of creative messaging and executions. Once you’ve weighed in with strategy, it’s time to move out.  Let your internal team and outside resources run with it. Translate their role into money and growth as the “only language” that truly matters to businesses. Share-of-voice, even share-of­ market, is not in today’s Chief Marketing Officer vernacular. Revenue, growth, and income are keywords being searched by CEO’s and boards. Move quickly from “doing” digital to being digital. Today’s CMO’s and tomorrow’s CGO’s are focusing on transitioning their organization into the digital age. Not search terms, social platforms, and SEO-but the entire enterprise. Can you say ”Amazon.” Transformation in the Healthcare Industry Not only do top marketers in hospitals and health systems share the same pressures as their counterparts at big brands, but they also have unique ones. As value-based replaces volume­ based revenue, marketers will have accountability in both patient experience and satisfaction in order to contribute to organizational growth. In addition, health system top marketing executives have to find a role to play in outcomes. Candace Quinn, of Candace Quinn Consulting, believes this shift will occur at the service line delivery level. According to Quinn, “many organizations have morphed to incorporating Chief roles around their Pillar structure, as popularized in the Studer teachings. Chief Quality Officer, Chief People! Talent Officer, Chief Finance Officer, as well as Chief Growth Officer. What we haven’t really started seeing yet is what makes the Chief Growth Officer’s role as powerful and as influential as it might be. How many organizations put more than Strategic Planning, Marketing, PR, Fundraising and Physician Relations within the scope of this role, like including service line leadership? Growth happens at the service line delivery level.  Linking these key leaders even in a matrix relationship would truly give bigger meaning to the ‘growth’ part of the Chief Growth Officer.” Paul Szablowski is a Senior Vice President and Experience Officer for Texas Health Resources in Dallas.  He is the organization’s top-ranked marketing executive, supports this shift toward growth and has witnessed it take place among his peers in hospital systems. He offers this advice. “Today, more than ever, CMO’s need to be submerged in the continuous...
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