Who can you trust as a spokesperson for your healthcare brand?

Who can you trust as a spokesperson for your healthcare brand?

It takes years to create a trusted brand; one that carries with it quality, safety, assurance, and credibility in the minds of your consumers.  Then, in an instant, it’s gone and – in many cases – impossible to get back. There are several reasons this occurs – some controlled (think Coke’s new recipe or Maker’s Mark less potent one), some out of control (think Tylenol).  According to David Horsager, author of “The Trust Edge,” a lack of trust is the biggest expense a brand can endure. One of the hot topics today when it comes to brand trust is the use of a spokesperson and whether this makes good sense for an organization. From Lance Armstrong and Tiger Woods (who reportedly lost $110 Million income in two weeks) in the sports world, to Bill Cosby and recently Brian Williams in the “entertainment” industry, to countless others, tying your brand to an individual is a risk you should seriously consider.  It has JELL-O shaking in its Nike shoes. Why is this a risky strategy?  Because you’re attaching your brand to an individual…a human being who, in the blink of an eye, or the push of a (camera) widget or tweet, can lose their credibility.   And, you can lose your brand trust. So, who can you trust?  Or should you even bother.  In today’s social media world, this risk of tying your brand to a spokesperson is greatly heightened!  PSM (pre social media), the use of a spokesperson was fairly predictable and solid.  Wilford Brimley, for example, was a great spokesperson for Quaker Oats in the 80’s and 90’s and brilliantly personified the...
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